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Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 000, [THini (2011) Printed 1 March 2013 (MN LM^ style file v2.2) 



Ionized gas velocity dispersion in nearby dwarf gal 
looking at supersonic turbulent motions. * 



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Alexei V. Moiseev^^f and Tatiana A. Lozinskaya^ 

^Special Astrophysical Observatory, Russian Academy of Sciences, Nizhnii Arkhyz, 369167 Russia 
'^Sternberg Astronomical Institute of Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow, 119992 Russia 



Accepted .... Received 



ABSTRACT 

We present the results of ionized gas turbulent motions study in several nearby 
dwarf galaxies using a scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer with the 6-m telescope of 
the SAO RAS. Combining the 'intensity- velocity dispersion' diagrams (/ — a) with 
two-dimensional maps of radial velocity dispersion we found a number of common 
patterns pointing to the relation between the value of chaotic ionized gas motions 
and processes of current star formation. In five out of the seven analysed galaxies we 
identified expanding shells of ionized gas with diameters of 80-350 pc and kinematic 
ages of 1-4 Myr. We also demonstrate that the I — a diagrams may be useful for 
the search of supernova remnants, other small expanding shells or unique stars in 
nearby galaxies. As an example, a candidate luminous blue variable (LBV) was found 
in UGC 8508. We propose some additions to the interpretation, previously used by 
Muhoz-Tuhon et al. to explain the I — a diagrams for giant star formation regions. In 
the case of dwarf galaxies, a major part of the regions with high velocity dispersion 
belongs to the diffuse low surface brightness emission, surrounding the star forming 
regions. We attribute this to the presence of perturbed low density gas with high 
values of turbulent velocities around the giant HII regions. 

Key words: galaxies: dwarf - galaxies: kinematics and dynamics - galaxies: ISM - 
ISM: bubbles - HII regions. 



1 INTRODUCTION 

The study of the gas component of dwarf galaxies is impor- 
tant and challenging for several reasons. Firstly, due to the 
shallow potential well and a lack of spiral density waves, such 
galaxies provide a good opportunity for studying the inter- 
action of young stellar groups with the interstellar medium. 
The ionizing radiation of OB stars, as well as the kinetic 
energy of stellar winds and supernova explosions are heat- 
ing the gas, forming the cavities, bubbles, shells, ordered 
outflows and chaotic turbulent motions in the gaseous disc. 
Secondly, it is important to be able to properly account for 
the influence of these effects on the gaseous medium in or- 
der to estimate the circular rotation curve from the observed 
distribution of radial velocities. The information about an 



"^ Based on observations obtained with the 6-m telescope of the 
Special Astrophysical Observatory of the Russian Academy of 
Sciences (SAO RAS). The observations were carried out with 
the financial support of the Ministry of Education and Sci- 
ence of Russian Federation (contracts no. 16.518.11.7073 and 
16.552.11.7028). 
t moisav@gmail.com 



accurate rotation curve is critical to study the distribution of 
dark matter and the mass function of dwarf galaxies within 
various cosmological tests. 

Two-dimensional distributions of the parameters of 
neutral and ionized hydrogen yield the most complete and 
detailed data on the structure and kinematics of the in- 
terstellar medium. We managed to compare the kinemat- 
ics of neutral and ionized gas for several dwarf galaxies of 
the Local Group using the ^positio n-velocity' diagram, al- 
lowing to identify expanding shells (Lozinskav a et al.ll2003l , 
2008). For more distant objects, the analysis of the ve- 
locity field and the shapes of Ha and 21 cm line profiles 
( "van Evmeren et al. Il2009al lbi) allows to identify gas outflows 
above the galactic plane. The advantage of the radio inter- 
ferometry method in the 21 cm line is the capability to map 
the HI distribution far beyond the optical discs of gala xies, 
see e.g. t he results of the FIGGS (|Begum et al.ll2008l ) and 
THINGS (|0h et al.ll2QlTI ) surveys. However, the typical an- 
gular resolution of such observations (beam= 10 — 30 arcsec) 
often provides an excessively smooth picture and does not 
allow to study the motions of gas on small spatial scales. In 
contrast to radio observations, with 3D spectroscopy in the 



© 2011 RAS 



2 Moiseev & Lozinskaya 



optical emission lines we can study the kinematics of ionized 
gas with a much higher resolution 1 — 3 arcsec. However, it 
is limited only to the regions, having enough UV-photons to 
ionize the gas. 

Until recently, most of the two-dimensional data on the 
kinematics of gas in dwarf galaxies were obtained from the 
radio observations in the HI line. Lately though, the sit- 
uation is changing. The results of optical studies of the 
kinematics not only for individual obj ects, but also for 
small samples of galaxies are publis hed (|Ostlin et al.lll999l : 
iMoiseev, Pustilnik fc Kniazevll201(/ V Velocity fields of ion- 
ized gas in two hundred galaxies of different morphological 
types, 23 of which belong to th e dirr type, were constructed 
within the GHASP survey (^Epinat, Amram fc MarcelinI 
I2OO8I I with the scanning Fabry- Perot interferometer (FPI). 
The growing accuracy of measurements allowed to build 
and analyze not only the radial velocity fields, but also 
the two-dimensional maps of ionized gas velocity disper- 
sion (a) in some dwarf galaxies with violent star formation. 
The a maps of such galaxies were published, resulting from 
the observations us ing the methods of i ntegral field spec- 
troscopy (see, e.g., Bordalo et al.l l2009l : iLagos et al.l |2009|; 
iMonreal-Ibero et al. l2010|l or interferometry with the scan- 
nin g FPI (Martinez-Delgado e t al. 1120071 : 1 L ozinskav a et al.l 
I2OO6 : Moiseev et al. 2010). Although such data as yet exist 
for less than two dozen objects, the number of constructed 
a maps will be growing. That way, we are preparing to pub- 
lish the r esults of observations of another few dozen of dwarf 
galaxies (JMoiseev. Tikhonov fc KlvpinllioTJ ). 

The nature of the supersonic (cr > 10 — 20kms~^) 
turbulent motions of ionized gas, observed in dwarf 
galaxies is the subject of a longstandi ng deba t e (se e 
discussion and references in Bordalo fc Telled l201lh . 
Thus, a number of authors (JTerlevich fc Melnickl Il98ll : 
iMelnick. Terlevich fc TerlevichI I2OOOI I believe that the 
intensity-weighted mean velocity dispersion of ionized gas 
(am) in dwarf galaxies and in giant HII regions is deter- 
mined by virial motions, i.e. by the total mas s of the sys- 
tem. O n the other hand, in their recent paper iGreen et al.l 
(|2010l l show that in a wide range of galaxy luminosities am 
is determined only by the current star formation rate (esti- 
mated from the flux in the Ha emission line) and does not 
correlate with the mass of the galaxy. In this case, am is a 
characteristic of mechanical energy, inferred to the gas by 
the stellar winds and supernova explosions in the process of 
current star formation. For neutral gas velocity dispersion, a 
similar conclusion was earlier made bv lDib. Bell fc BurkertI 
(20061 

To address this and other problems, related to the in- 
teraction of stellar populations and interstellar medium, 
we must be able to correctly interpret the structures, ob- 
served in the ionized gas velocity dispersion maps. Among 
the fe w studies on this subje ct, let us mention t he pa - 
pers bv lYanget aTl (|l996l ) and lMunoz-Tunon et aP (Il996h . 
who thoroughly examined two giant star formation regions 
NGC604 and NGC 588 in the disc of the M33 galaxy. The 
authors proposed a method for interpreting the observed 
distributions of points on the 'line intensity-velocity disper- 
sion' diagram (/ — a) in terms of evolution of ionized shells 
in stellar groups. Later, with the aid of these and other sim- 
ilar diagrams Martinez-Delgado et al. I ((2007 ) examined the 
behaviour of ionized gas in three more distant BCD galaxies. 



How universal is this method? This paper is a sub- 
sequent attempt to thoroughly consider the nature of the 
structures, observed in the ionized gas velocity dispersion 
maps. The observational data presented here were obtained 
at the 6-m telescope of the SAO RAS within the project 
devoted to the internal kinematics of ionized gas in dwarf 
galaxies of the Local Volume {D < 10 Mpc). To correctly 
interpret the results of this project, it seems to be neces- 
sary to consider the most typical features, observed in the a 
maps. In order to make a detailed analysis, we have selected 
seven most nearby galaxies {D — 1.8 — 4.3 Mpc) from the 
total sample, where we managed to fairly well study both 
the bright HII regions, and faint diffuse Ha emission be- 
tween them. It is important that there are HI distribution 
maps published for all the selected galaxies, which allows to 
compare the distributions of ionized and neutral fractions of 
the interstellar medium. In order to better understand the 
features of the a distribution, we employ the data on two 
more nearby dIrr galaxies, IC 10 and IC 1613, we previously 
studied in detail. 



2 OBSERVATIONS AND DATA REDUCTION 

2.1 Observations Avith the scanning FPI 

The observations were made at the prime focus of the 6-m 
telescope of SAO RAS using a scanning F PI, installe d inside 
the SCORPIO focal reducer (JAfanasiev fc MoiseevI l2005l ). 
The operating spectral range around the Ha line was cut by 
a narrow-band filter with a bandwidth of FWHM = 15 — 
21 A. Most of the observations were made with the FPI501 
interferometer, providing in the Ka line a free spectral range 
between the neighboring interference orders AA = 13 A and 
spectral resolution (FWHM of the instrumental profile) of 
about 0.8A (35kms~^), with the scale of 0.36A per chan- 
nel. In November 2009, a new interferometer FPI751 was 
used, having AA = 8.7 A and a spectral resolution of 0.4A 
(18kms~^) at the scale of 0.21 A per channel. 

Between 2005-2009 we used the EEV 42-40 and 
E2V 42-90 CCD detectors, providing the image scale of 
0.71 arcsec pixel" ^ in 4 x 4 on-chip binned mode. In 2002 
a TK1024 CCD detector was used operating in on-chip 
binned 2x2 pixel mode, yielding the image scale of 
0.56 arcsec pixel" ^ . 

During the scanning process, we have consistently ob- 
tained 36 interferograms of a given object (40 for FPI751) 
at different distances between the FPI plates. The seeing 
at different nights ranged from 1 to 3 arcsec. The data re- 
duction was performed using the software package running 
in the IDL environment. Following the primary reduction, 
airglow lines subtraction, photometric and seeing corrections 
using the reference stars and wavelength calibration, the ob- 
servational data were combined into the data cubes, where 
each pixel in the field of view contains a 36- (or a 40-) 
channel spectrum. The detailed descriptio n of data reduc - 
tion algorithms and softw are is presented in lMoiseevI (|2002l l: 
iMoiseev k Egorovl (|2008l ). All galaxies except VII Zw 403 
were observed in two scanned cycles in o rder to remove par- 
asitic ghost refllection, as described by iMoiseev &: Egorovl 
(2008). 

The log of observations is given in Table [U listing the 



© 2011 RAS, MNRAS OQO.nif20] 



Ionized gas in dwarf galaxies 3 



following data: the name of the galaxy; the distance, scale 
(p carcsec~^) and absolute s tellar magnitude Mb according 
to lKarachentsev et alj (|2004l l: the epoch of observations; the 
type of interferometer; total exposure time; resulting angu- 
lar resolution (cj) after the smoothing by a two-dimensional 
Gaussian (typical FWHM = 1.0 — 2.0 pix) in order to in- 
crease the signal-to-noise ratio in the regions of low surface 
brightness. This value was estimated from foreground stars 
images in final data cube. 



Table 2. Shell parameters 



2.2 Velocity dispersion measurements 

Referring to the velocity dispersion of ionized gas (a) in 
the present paper we mean the standard deviation of the 
Gaussian, describing the profile of the Ho; emission line af- 
ter accounting for the FPI instrumental profile and sub- 
tracting the contribution of thermal broadening in the 
HII refflons. We used th e method described in detail in 
iMoiseev &; Egorovl (|2008l ). 

The width of the instrumental profile of the FPI was 
measured from the calibration lamp line spectrum. The ob- 
served Ha line profiles were fitted by the Voigt function, 
which gives a good description of the observed profile. From 
the results of profile fitting, we constructed two-dimensional 
radial velocity fields of ionized gas, radial velocity disper- 
sion maps free from the effects of the instrumental profile 
{(Jreai), as wcll as thc galaxy images in the Ha emission line 
and in the continuum. The flux maps were calibrated to the 
absolute scale of surface brightness (ergss""^ cm~^ arcsec"^) 
by normalizing to the total flu x of the galaxy in the Ha line, 
known from the literature fsee lMoiseev et al]|2012l V 

The accuracy of velocity dispersion was estimated from 
the measurements of t he signal-to-noise ratio, us ing the re- 
lations, given in Fig. s JMoiseev fc Egorovl (J2008). On the a 
maps, we masked the regions with a weak signal, where the 
formal error of velocity dispersion measurements exceeded 
6 — 9 kms~^ (which corresponds to the S/N ^ 7). Meanwhile 
the line flux maps were constructed confidently enough even 
for weaker lines, down to S/N ?^ 2 — 3. 

The transition from the measured a reai to the needed a 
was done according to the relation from iRozas et al.l (|2000h : 



2 
^real 



2 
■ CTn 



2 
■ CTtr 



(1) 



where aN ~ 3kms~^ and atr ~ 9.1kms~^ correspond to 
the natural width of the emission line and its thermal broad- 
ening at 10^ K. 

In the case of UGC 8508, using the formula ([!]) we get to 
cr^ < in the centre of several HII regions. This is most likely 
caused by a smaller value of thermal broadening there due 
to Te < 10^ K. For this galaxy we adopted atr = 7.5kms~^ 
that corresponds to the Te ~ 6800 K. 

In most of the objects, the observed line profile is very 
well described by a single-component Voigt profile. 

Of all the galaxies considered, only UGC 8508 and 
UGCA 92 have regions in which the Ha profile reveals 
two components with ther velocity separation larger than, 
or comparable to the spectral resolution limit (35 and 
18kms~^ respectively). 



name 


size 


dm ax 


^kin 




pc 


kms"-*^ 


(Myr) 


DDO 53 #1 


240 X 240 


39 


3.0 


DDO 53 #2 


150 X 140 


37 


2.0 


DDO 53 #3 


150 X 150 


37 


2.0 


DDO 125 #1 


200 X 200 


27 


3.6 


DDO 125 #2 


160 X 120 


25 


3.1 


UGC 8508 #1 


350 X 350 


40 


4.2 


UGCA 92 #1 


180 X 130 


39 


2.2 


UGCA 92 #2 


190 X 110 


31 


3.1 


UGCA 92 #3 


90 X 90 


31 


1.4 


UGCA 92 #4 


170 X 170 


40 


2.1 


VII Zw403#l 


190 X 190 


33 


2.8 



3 I -a DIAGRAMS 

Figure [1] shows the monochromatic images in the Ha line, 
the (T maps, as well as the I — a diagrams for a ll the galax- 
ies. Our diagrams differ from thos e built earlier ([Yang et al. 



19961: iMufioz-Tunon et al.1 Il996l : iMartinez-Delgado et aL 



20071 ): instead of the peak line intensity (/peafc), we use the 
total flux in the line (/), having a clearer physical mean- 
ing (the luminosity per area unit). Since the a maps were 
masked by the fixed S/N level, and the noise level in the 
outer regions is mainly determined by the sky background, 
the left-hand side boundary of the point cloud in the dia- 
grams is an inclined line / ^ cripeak, where Ipeak = const. 
The main advantages of the / against Ipeak is that the total 
flux obviously does not depend on spectral resolution. In or- 
der to understand the difference of result using / instead of 
Ipeak we have created both types diagrams for the sample 
galaxies and we conclude that all the shell-like features are 
preserved on the diagrams. We also abandoned the linear 
scale of intensities and use the log/, since the observed sur- 
face brightness difference is 2-3 orders of magnitude, which 
is significantly larger than the brightness range inside the 
giant HII regions in iMunoz-Tunon et al.l (| 19961 ). 

The characteristic features, commented on below, are 
illustrated with different colours in the diagrams. The hor- 
izontal lane in dark blue has a relatively low velocity dis- 
persion a and high surface brightness. The boundaries of 
brightness are chosen so that the highlighted regions con- 
tain 50% of the total luminosity of the galaxy in the Ha 
emission line. By red, yellow and green colours we show the 
regions with increased a, trying to wherever possible identify 
the shell structures. The red line in the diagrams marks the 
level of mean velocity dispersion across the galaxy, intensity- 
weighted in the i-th pixel: am = ^adi/^U. When we 
further refer to 'high' or 'low' velocity dispersion, we have 
in mind a > am and a ^ am, respectively. For instance, 
other regions with a > am are shown by orange, whereas 
low- luminosity regions with low a are marked in gray. 

Figure [1] also contains maps indicating the locations of 
regions, marked on the corresponded I — a diagrams. 

3.1 DDO 53 

The kinematics of ionized gas in this galaxy was previously 
investigated with the scanning FPI by D icaire et al. (20081 ), 
but the authors were only able to measure the distribution 



© 2011 RAS, MNRAS OOO.fTIl20l 



4 Moiseev & Lozinskaya 



DD053: Ha image 



Velocity dispersion, km/s 
10 Jo 30 




20 -20 

Aa, orcsec 




20 -20 

Aa, orcsec 



DD053 




I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 

-16.5 -16.0 -15.5 -15.0 
Log I, erg s"^ cm"^ orcsec"^ 



-14 






40 



20 



- 



-20 



-40 




- (-17.0,-16.7,-16.4,-16.1, 
I ^ \ ^ ^ ^ \ ^ ^ i 



-15.8,-15.5,-15.2,-14 
_J ^ ^ ^ \ ^ ^ 



,9,-14.6) 

J \ ^ L 



40 20 -20 

Aa, orcsec 



-40 



Figure 1. Results of observations with the FPI for each galaxy. The top row: the image in the Ho; line in logarithmic values of intensity 
(left) and the velocity dispersion map with superimposed contours of the Ha image (right). The ellipses with numbers mark the shell-like 
structures, the parameters of which are given in Table [21 For DDO 125 and UGC 8508 the ellipses without numbers show large-scale 
cavern, discussed in the text. The cross marks the centre of the image in the continuum. The bottom row: the intensity-velocity dispersion 
diagram (left). The red horizontal line marks the intensity- weighted mean velocity dispersion (Jm- The right plot shows the location of 
regions, marked by different colours on the I — a diagram. The contours correspond to the isophotes in the Ho; line, their values (in log 
of ergss"-*^ cm~^ arcsec"^) are printed in brackets at the right bottom figures. 



© 2011 RAS, MNRAS OQO.nif20] 



Ionized gas in dwarf galaxies 5 



Table 1. Log of the observations 



Name 


D 




scale 


Mb 


Date 


FPI 


Exp. time 


u; 






(Mpc) 


(pc arcsec -^ ) 








time (s) 


(arcsec) 


(pc) 


DDO 53 


3.56 




17 


-13.21 


26.02.2009 


FPI501 


200 X 36 


3.3 


57 


DD0 99 


2.64 




13 


-13.41 


26.02.2009 


FPI501 


180 X 36 


3.8 


49 


DDO 125 


2.54 




12 


-14.07 


18.05.2005 


FPI501 


180 X 36 


3.0 


37 


DDO 190 


2.79 




14 


-14.13 


04.03.2009 


FPI501 


100 X 36 


3.3 


45 


UGC 8508 


2.56 




12 


-12.92 


16.05.2005 


FPI501 


200 X 36 


3.0 


37 


UGCA 92 


1.80 




9 


-14.48 


10.11.2009 


FPI751 


180 X 40 


2.5 


22 


VII Zw 403 


4.34 




21 


-13.87 


29.11.2002 


FPI501 


300 X 36 


2.2 


46 



of radial velocities in the bright HII regions, whereas our 
data include the regions of faint diffuse emission. The a map 
clearly reveals a pattern, typical of all galaxies we observed: 
the minimum value of velocity dispersion is seen in the cen- 
ters of bright HII regions, while in the space between the 
star formation regions and in the outer parts of the galaxy 
a reaches its maximal values up to 40 — 50kms~^, which 
clearly points to the supersonic nature of motions. 

The shape of the I — cf diagram resembles th e scheme, 
given in the paper bv iMufioz-Tunon et alJ (| 19961 ) - a hori- 
zontal lane (marked in dark blue in the Fig. [T]) with a ~ cTm 
and several inclined lanes wit h much larger a values. Ac - 
cording to the interpretation of iMunoz-Tunon et alJ (| 19961 ). 
such lanes must correspond to individual thin expanding 
shells: the maximal velocity dispersion (or even a double 
profile) and the minimal surface brightness at the centre of 
the shell; increasing / and decreasing a with the growing 
distance from the centre until the inner edge of the shell is 
reached. The best example of such a shell is given by a struc- 
ture, adjacent to the north of the brightest HII region, in the 
diagram it is coloured yellow (centre) and dark green (pe- 
riphery). This shell-like structure is also evident in the Ha 
surface brightness distribution. In the figure we marked it 
as #1, its diameter is approximately d ^ 14 arcsec (240 pc). 
For all the shells we identified Table [2] gives the estimates 
of the sizes along the major and minor axes {di,d2), the 
maximal velocity dispersion amax and the kinematic ages 

The points from the second, less contrast peak in 
the diagram (marked in red and green) have to cor- 
respond to a younger sh ell according to the model by 
(|Munoz-Tuii6n et al.lll996l V On our maps the points of this 
peak mainly lie in two shells, designated nos. #2 and #3. 
According to Table [21 their kinematic age is in fact about 1.5 
times shorter than that of the shell #1. On the other hand, 
the points from the most apparent peak on the diagram (or- 
ange colour, high a and relatively low surface brightness) do 
not belong to any individual knots or shells, but form a com- 
mon diffuse envelope which surrounds bright HII regions. 



3.2 DDO 99 

Unlike the previous case, the I — a diagram for DDO 99 
has a simpler shape - there are no pronounced features, 
except for the horizontal lane and a broad triangular region 
with a high a. Some kind of a hint for a possible shell is a 
tiny cloud of points in the diagram with log/ > —15.7, a > 
21 kms""*^ (marked in green). On the map of the galaxy, these 



points are grouped mainly on the edge of the southern star 
formation region, the size of this possible shell is comparable 
to the spatial resolution of ^ 50 pc. The remaining regions of 
increased a (plotted in orange in the figure) are distributed 
on the periphery of HII regions. 



3.3 DDO 125 

The distribution of ionized gas here reveals several shells and 
loops, associated with two bright star formation regions to 
the north and south of the galactic centre. These two HII re- 
gions are located diametrically on the edge of a giant cavity, 
sized around 600 pc (denoted in Fig[T]as 'Cavern'), inside of 
which there are almost no sources of gas ionization. In the 
centre of the cavity the HI density is also reduced (see Sec- 
tion [5] below), indicating that the gas was depleted or swept- 
out during the previous burst of star formation. The size of 
the cavity and the features of mutual distribution of HI and 
HII are very similar to the comp lex of giant she l ls and arcs 
in th e galaxy IC 1613 (.Lozinskava et al.l l2003l : ISilich et 1.1 
|2006|), with a diameter from 300 pc to 1 kpc. We were un- 
able to find any kinematic evidence for the expansion of shell 
DD0125 #1, as it is not identified on the I — a diagram. At 
once the a distribution easily reveals a more compact shells 
DD0125 #1, and ,#2 which coincides with the northern and 
southern HII regions (coloured red and green in the figure). 
Our estimate of its age is tkin — 3.1 — 3.6M2/r. Other regions 
with high a^ marked in the map with orange, are emborder- 
ing the bright star forming regions. 



3.4 DDO 190 

The distribution of the ionized gas velocity dispersion and 
the I — a diagram here resemble the picture, observed in 
DDO 99. Namely, the points with high a surround bright HII 
regions; velocity dispersion in HII regions is comparable to 
am- Only a few low-contrast peaks of the velocity dispersion 
around the elongated HII region in the northern part of the 
galaxy can be regarded here as a vague hin t to t he shell 
(in terms of the model bv iMunoz-Tunon et al.lll996h . These 
possible shells with sizes comparable to the spatial resolution 
of our observations are coloured green in the diagram. 



3.5 UGC 8508 

The observed distribution of a is very similar to previous 
objects: a minimal velocity dispersion inside the HII regions 
surrounded by the diffuse gas with increased a. In addition. 



© 2011 RAS, MNRAS 000,[TH20] 



6 Moiseev & Lozinskaya 



DD099: Ha image 




20 -20 

Aa, arcsec 



60 



40 



20 



-20 



-40 



-60 - 



Velocity dispersion, km/s 
10 15 20 25 30 



.6^'^ 




35 



60 40 20 -20 

Aa, arcsec 



-40 



-60 



DD099 



40 
50 

20 


; „ DD099; 

* 
■ 

3k * 

flSP ^ * 


10 


" , , 1 , , , , 1 , , , , 1 , , , , 1 , , , , 1 i.--^; 



-16.5 -16.0 -15.5 -15.0 

Log I, erg s"^ cm"^ arcsec"^ 



-14.5 






60 



40 



20 



- 



-20 



-40 



-60 




(-16.7,-16.4,-16.2,-15.9,-15.7,-15.4,-15.2,-14.9,-14.7) 
I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 



60 40 20 -20 -40 -60 

Aa, arcsec 



Figure 1 - continued 



the I — a diagram reveals an inc lined lane, which should cor - 
respond to a shell according to iMunoz-Tunon et alJ (|l996l ). 

Indeed, most of the points of this lane (marked in Fig.[T] 
with red and green) are concentrated within a huge arch of 
HII regions on the edge of the western part of the disc of 
ionized gas. Morphologically and kinematically this resem- 
bles a half of an unclosed expanding shell with a diameter 
of approximately 350 pc. The kinematic age of this shell, we 
designated as UGC 8508 #1, is about 4 Myr (Table©. 



In a recent paper IWarren et al. I (|201ll ) showed that the 
eastern half of the galaxy has a cavity in the HI distribution 
with a diameter of about 550 pc, so that the bright HII 
regions are located along its borders. However, this region 
(denoted as 'Cavern' in our figure) is not distinguishable by 
the kinematics of ionized gas - velocity dispersion is small, 
except for several spots with increased a in the heart of this 
cavity, where almost no Ha emission is present. They are 
difficult to be interpreted as a separate shell, most likely we 



© 2011 RAS, MNRAS QQQ.fTti20] 



Ionized gas in dwarf galaxies 7 



60 



40 



20 



-20 - 



-40 



-60 



DD0125: Ha image 



Velocity dispersion, km/s 
10 15 20 25 30 35 



I ' ' ' I ' ' ' I ' ' ' I ' ' ' I ' ' ' I ' ' ' I 




1 kpc 



I I I I I I I I I I I I I 



60 40 20 -20 -40 

Aa, orcsec 



-60 




DD0125 




■I - I ^ ^ L 

-16.5 -16.0 -15.5 

Log I, erg s"^ cm"^ orcsec"^ 



60 



40 



20 



- 



-20 



-40 



-60 




(-17.0,-16.8,-16.5,-16.3,-16.0,-15. 
I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 



.,-15.5,-15.3) 
I I I I I I I 



60 40 20 -20 

Aa, orcsec 



-40 



-60 



Figure 1 - continued 



are talking about an increase of turbulent velocities on the 
border of HII regions. 

A group of points, forming a 'horizontal sequence' in 
the upper right part of the I — a diagram caught our eye, 
since the surface brightness here is considerably greater 
than for the other points with a large velocity dispersion 
(cr = 35 — 40kms~^). All the points, marked brick-red in 
our scheme, are grouped within the single Ha knot on the 
eastern edge of the disc. Its FWHM in the image is equal to 



the size of stellar images, i.e. it can not be spatially resolved. 
The Ha line profile has a distinct two-peak structure here 
with the distance between peaks of about 80kms~^. The 
examples of emission line profiles are shown in Fig|2] The 
mean systemic velocity of the knot is about lOOkms"^ in 
agreement with line-of-sight velocities of the nearest side of 
the galaxy disc (^ 80kms~^), i.e. it seems to belong the 
UGC 8508. Our first explanation, based on the Ha double 
component profiles was that we observe a single remnant of 



© 2011 RAS, MNRAS QOQ.fTMOl 



8 Moiseev & Lozinskaya 



Velocity dispersion, km/s 



40 - 



DD0190: Ha image 





DD0190 



45 


■■ 


, 1 11 11 1 




DD0190; 


40 


- 4 
* 






- 




* 
• * 


'* 




- 


35 


.-*'/. ,. 






- 






■ 




- 




ft * ' 






: 


" 30 
if) 


;/^JB*^, 


'***> 




- 




-* m^ff^^M 


f t 










K '.-. 






b 25 


v^IhS 


Oft ^ 




- 




^ ^^sn 


^^^h *^^\f ^ V 




_ 






BNnp^. -' 




- 


20 


<^*^HI 


^'^HHbk^ 


^^ / 


.V * 








^V 


:jlS:a* 


15 




■ 


^ :-v,- -■: *■- 




# ■■ 








10 




< 1 < < < < 1 




^ 



-17.0 -16.5 -16.0 -15.5 -15.0 -14.5 
Log I, erg s"^ cm"^ arcsec"^ 







20 -20 

Aa, orcsec 



Figure 1 - continued 



the supernova explosion (similar to the SNR S8 in IC1613, 
see below). However, our new spectroscopic observations re- 
vealed that it is a good candidate to unique emission star - 
luminous blue variable (see Sect. lA)) . 



3.6 UGCA 92 

We observe here the most significant asymmetry in the dis- 
tribution of ionized gas relative to the centre among all the 



galaxies of our sample. In the Ha line image, several shells 
and arcs are seen, most of which are related to the bright star 
formation region in the eastern part of the galaxy. There, 
five HH regions form a closed elongated loop in the centre of 
which a maximum in the a distribution is observed. One can 
discern a broad inclined lane on the I — a diagram (coloured 
green and orange), the corresponded points lying inside the 
above-mentioned loop of HH regions. Meanwhile, in the cen- 
tre of the loop, where the velocity dispersion is maximal and 



© 2011 RAS, MNRAS QQQ.fTti20] 



Ionized gas in dwarf galaxies 9 



40 - 



UGC8508: Ha image 



Velocity dispersion, km/s 
10 20 30 




Aa, orcsec 




U8508 



40 


- ' ' ' ' U ' 


J 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 
■ 


U8508: 


30 




■■ 


- 


20 






- 


10 


"•V/*^f^ 


< 1 < < < < 1 < < 


, , , J 



-16.5 -16.0 -15.5 

Log I, erg s"^ cm"^ arcsec~ 






-15.0 



Figure 1 - continued 




20 -20 

Aa, orcsec 



intensity is minimal, the Ha line profiles have a noticeable 
right wing, so that they can be decomposed into two compo- 
nents - a more intense blue one and a 1.5-2 times fainter red 
one (see Fig|2]). The separation between the components is 
AV = 45 — 57 kms~^, decreasing from the centre to edges. 
This multicomponent profile structure could not be a result 
of spatial smoothing procedures ('beam smearing'), because 
the peak velocity in the HII regions, that formed this loop 
is constant zblOkms"^. The observed features indicate that 



we are dealing with a shell (designated as UGCA 92 #2), 
expanding at a rate of Vexp = |^^ ~ 30kms~^, this value 
coincides with the maximal velocity dispersion in this re- 
gion (see Tab. [2]). The velocity dispersion distribution easily 
reveals three more expanding shells of similar size and age. 
It is possible that the external arch structures in the west- 
ern and eastern parts of the galaxy have the same nature, 
however, we failed to measure their expansion velocity. 



© 2011 RAS, MNRAS O00.nil20l 



10 Moiseev & Lozinskaya 



Velocity dispersion, km/s 
10 15 20 25 30 



60 



40 



20 



UGCA92: Ha image 
I ' ' ' I ' ' ' I ' ' ' I ' ' ' I ' ' 



-20 



-40 



-60 h L 
I I 




1 kpc 



60 40 20 -20 

Aa, orcsec 



-40 



-60 




20 -20 

Aa, orcsec 



UGCA92 



UGCA92: 




J I I I I I I I I I L 

-15.5 -15.0 -14.5 

Log I, erg s"^ cm"^ orcsec"^ 



< 




-60 



20 -20 -40 

Aa, orcsec 



Figure 1 - continued 



3.7 VII Zw 403 

We present here the r e-analyzed data first described in 
I Loz inskaya et alj (|2006h . An empty spot near the centre is 
caused by masking the tr ace of a bright parasitic reflex (see 
iMoiseev fc Egorovl (|2008l ) for details on the ghost reflex). 
Galaxy VII Zw 403 is one of the most well-des cribed in the 
literat ure objects of our sample. According to Lynds et al. 
(|l998h the age of the latest burst of star formation here 
is 4-10 Myr, which closely coincides with the estimates 



of the kinematic age of shells, associated with bright re- 
gions of star formation (at least 3-4 Myr old, according to 
Lozinskaya et al. 2006J. On the other hand, the velocity dis- 
persion of ionized gas in the HII regions themselves is small: 
cr < {(Jm = 18kms~^). The I — a diagram confidently reveals 
an inclined lane (marked with green and orange) wh ich, ac- 
cording to the model by iMunoz-Tunon et al.l (|l996l l , must 
point to the presence of an expanding shell. 

The distribution of points on the map of the galaxy 



© 2011 RAS, MNRAS QQQ.fTti20] 



Ionized gas in dwarf galaxies 11 



Velocity dispersion, km/s 
10 15 20 25 30 



VIIZw403: Ha image 




10 

Aa, orcsec 




10 -10 

Aa, orcsec 



VIIZw403 



40 



50 



20 



10 




VIIZw403: 



■ ■,^**flW 



-16.5 



-16.0 -15.5 -15.0 -14.5 
Log I, erg s"^ cm"^ orcsec"^ 



-14.0 



< 



30 



20 



10 r 



r 



■10 



-20 : 



-30 




(-16.3,-16.0,-15.7,-15.4,-15.1,-14.8,- 
il I I I Iiii 



14.5,-14.2) 

M ill h 



30 



20 10 -10 

Aa, orcsec 



-20 -30 



Figure 1 - continued 



shows that this sheh (VII Zw 403 #1) is located between the 
bright HII regions in the centre of the galaxy and is adja- 
cent t o region 4 according to the numbering of Lvnd s et al.1 
(|l998r ). The kinematic age of the sh ell coincides with the 
estimates by I Lozinskava et al.1 (|2006[ ) given abovqj. Other 
regions of increased velocity dispersion are located at the pe- 



riphery of the HII regions and in the outer parts of the disc 
of ionized gas. The local gas kinematics is difficult to explain 
in terms of individual shells. Thus, several spots with high 
velocity dispersion in the northern part of the galaxy are 
more likely associated with the em ission arcs of relat ively 
low surface brightness, detected bv ISilich et al.l (|2002n and 



^ Note that the use of the approximation by the Voigt profile in sion rate 

our work allows making more accurate estimates of the expan- (1200 



than the Gaussian approximation in I Lozinskava et al.l 



© 2011 RAS, MNRAS OOO.fTIl20l 



12 Moiseev & Lozinskaya 



Table 3. Smoothing of the observational data on galaxies of the 
Local Group 



Name 


D 

(Mpc) 


UJ 

(arcsec) 


(pc) 


(arcsec) 


(pc) 


IC 10 
IC 1613 


0.73 
0.80 


1.5 
2.2 


5.3 

8.5 


11 
11 


40 
43 



I Lozinskaya et alJ (|2006l ). According to the cited authors, 
these arcs were caused by the feedback of the stellar pop- 
ulation aged t ^ 10 Myr, formed at the early stages of the 
last burst of star formation. 



4 THE EFFECT OF SPATIAL RESOLUTION 



lYang et al.1 (1996) and lMunoz-Tunon et aP (|l996 ') have dis- 
cussed and interpreted the I — a diagrams, constructed 
for the giant complexes of star formation in the nearby 
galaxy M33. The spatial resolution of their observations was 
a; ?^ 3.5 pc. In this work we study more distant galaxies with 
a much rougher resolution (see the last column in Table [1]) . 
It is hence clear that we are loosing the data on the small- 
scale kinematics of gas. How seriously may this affect the 
shape of the I — a diagrams and the distribution of velocity 
dispersion? In order to analyze the effects of spatial resolu- 
tion on the observed kinematics, we examined two nearby 
and well- studied dwarf irregular galaxies of the Local Group: 
IC 10 and IC 1613. We have earlier observed both galaxies 
at the 6-m telescope with the same equipment, described in 
Section [2l The spatial size of regions, encompassed by cur- 
rent star formation is about 1 kpc, just like in the galaxies 
described above (hereinafter - the 'main sample'). A de- 
tailed description of the distributions of ionized and neutral 
gas, the identification of the expanding HI and HII bubbles, 
and a discussion of the relation be tween these bubb l es and 
you ng stellar groups are ^iven in Lozinskava et al.l (|2008l l 



andlEgorov. Lozinsk aya fc MoiseevI ((2010|) for IC 10, and ir 
I Lozinskava e t al. (2003) ^or IC 1613. The spatial resolution 
of our observations of ionized hydrogen in the Ha emission 
line was 5 pc and 8 pc correspondingly. 

To imitate the effect of low resolution, the original 
data cubes for IC 10 and IC 1613 in the Ha line were 
first smoothed by the two-dimensional Gaussians, and then 
binned, so that the resulting pixel size amounted to ^ 5.6 
arcsec. Table[3]lists the distance to the galaxy, and the initial 
{(jj) and smoothed {uJsmo) spatial resolution. The smoothed 
data show how these two galaxies would look like when ob- 
served with a resolution of uosmo ~ 40 pc, i.e. under the 
same conditions as the objects of the main sample. The 
velocity dispersion maps and the diagrams for the original 
and smoothed cubes were constructed, using the method 
described in Section [21 Figure [3] shows the original and 
smoothed images of both galaxies in the Ha line, and the 
corresponding I — a diagrams are shown in Figs. |4] and [5l 

The I — a diagrams, constructed from the non-smoothed 
data, reveal a fine structure that reflects the data on gas 
motions on the scales of a few tens of par sees. It is obvi- 
ously lost in the smoothed data, since the construction of 
the corresponding diagrams involves a significantly smaller 



(by 100-200 times) number of points. A detailed review of 
the diagrams and the a distribution maps allows to make 
the following conclusions: 

• smoothing significantly (by 5-10 times) decreases the 
observed range of surface brightness / by 'smearing' the 
compact bright HII regions. This is particularly notable in 
the case of ICIO (Figg]); 

• similarly, the observed spread of a values decreases al- 
most twice due to the averaging of small-scale perturbations. 
On the other hand, smoothing has almost no effect on the 
weighted average value of the velocity dispersion am , since 
the variations of radial velocity inside a sampled element 
('beam-smearing effect') are small, compared with the mag- 
nitude of turbulent velocities; 

• the shape of the distribution of points on the / — a di- 
agram preserves its old 'triangular' form - a horizontal lane 
with a ^ am (coloured dark blue) and the regions of low sur- 
face brightness with high velocity dispersion. It is also well 
seen how the deteriorating resolution results in the merger 
of separate regions with high a, located on the periphery of 
HII regions, into a common structure, embordering the star 
formation regions. That is exactly the picture we often see 
in the main sample galaxies. 

Large-scale kinematically isolated structures remain 
visible in the smoothed images as well. In ICIO this is pri- 
marily the so-called synchrotron superbubble, located on 
the southern boundary of the brightest (eastern) star for- 
mation region, and prominent by its increased velocity dis- 
persi on. We have previously shown (jLozinskava fc MoiseevI 
l2007f ) that this shell centering in the X-ray source ICIO X-1 
is probably a remnant of an hypernova explosion. IC 1613 
data reveal a complex of multiple shells, located in the east- 
ern part of the star- forming region (coloured red and orange 
in Fig|5|). Here, the Ha line profiles have a clear two-peak 
structure with the velocity differ ence between t h e com po- 
nents of AV ^ 100 km s"^ In Lozinskav a et al.1 (|2003l ) we 
thoroughly examined the P-V diagrams for this region and 
showed that the observed kinematic features are associated 
with the effect of expanding and possibly colliding shells of 
ionized gas. Among the galaxies from the main sample, sim- 
ilar kinematic components at congruent spatial scales was 
detected only in UGCA92. The second interesting feature 
that attracts attention in the I — a diagrams in IC1613 is the 
brightest in the Ha line compact region at the centre of the 
field (with coordinates (Ax = 150'', A?/ = 90'')), also char- 
acterized by a high velocity dispersion {a ^ 50 — 60 km s~^). 
In Fig|5] it is marked in green. This is a remnant of the 
supernova S8, which stands out by its unusually high lu- 
minosity simultaneously in the X-ray (a marker of a young 
remnant) and optical (a marker of an old remnant) ranges 
([Lozinskava et al.l ll998i V The emission line profile has a 
mult i- component structure here. A object with a similar 
position in / — cr diagram and also with multicomponent 
profile from the main sample of galaxies is a LBV candidate 
in UGC 8508. 



5 DISCUSSION 

In all of the above galaxies there exists a clear link between 
the flux in the Ha line and velocity dispersion of ionized gas. 



© 2011 RAS, MNRAS QQQ.fTti20] 



Ionized gas in dwarf galaxies 13 



UGC 8508 knot 



UGCA92 (#2) 




Figure 2. The regions possessing emission line profiles with a two-component structure, overlapped on the Ho; images: UGC 8508 (left) 
and UGC A 92 (right). 



The brightest HII regions reveal small line widths (a ^ am), 
the scatter of observed values increases with decreasing sur- 
face brightness, so that in most regions of low brightness the 
velocity dispersion significantly exceeds the mean (a ^ am), 
although individual points may still show a low velocity dis- 
persion (a ^ 3 — 7kms~^). In general, the shape of the I— a 
diagram for dwarf irregular galaxies bears resemblanc e to 
the diagram constructed by Mufioz-Tuiion et alJ (l996) for 
the star formation regions NGC 588 and NGC 604. Such a 
resemblance is not surprising in objects of different scales, 
since in both cases the kinematics of gas must be primar- 
ily determined by the input of mechanical energy of wind 
of massive young stars and multiple supernovae explosions, 
the interaction of which with the circumambient interstellar 
medium depends on its density. 

However, there is a number of differences between the 
kinematic properties of giant HII regions and Irr galaxies; 
the sketch presented in Fig. [71 illustrates the diference. 

The full scale of the regions in NGC 588 and NGC 604, 
emitting in the Ha line is not larger than 130-150 pc, hence, 
at the corresponding I — a diagrams the entire region of in- 
crease d velocity dispersion s plits into several inclined lanes, 
which iMunoz-Tunon et al.l (|l996h identify with expanding 
ionized shells that differ by age. In the scheme they pro- 
pose, which is illustrated in our Fig. [71 (inset b), the cen- 
tre of the expanding thin shell, when projected onto the 
sky plane, has a low surface brightness and a large veloc- 
ity dispersion, determined by the expansion velocity. With 
increasing distance from the centre of the shell the Balmer 
emission lines intensity increases (the line-of-sight intersects 
an even thicker layer), and a declines, since the projection 
of expansion velocity onto the line-of-sight decreases. 

In the galaxies considered above the pattern is more 
complex. Here the total spatial size of the regions, where 



we examine the motions of ionized gas is significantly (8- 
10 times) larger. In 5 out of 7 galaxies of the main sample 
(DD053, DD0125, UGC 8508, UGCA 92, and VII Zw 403) 
we were able to identify the expanding shells of about 80-350 
pc in size. The points belonging to these shells are forming 
inclined lanes on the diagrams as well. However, we were 
unable to associate the bulk of points having a high veloc- 
ity dispersion with such structures. This is not surprising, 
since the formation of giant shells in itself requires a num- 
ber of specific conditions (a sufficient initial gas density, a 
simultaneous onset of starburst), and in most cases, it can 
be the result of the influence of sev eral generations of star 
group s on the inter stellar medium ([McQuinn et al. I I2OIOI : 
Warren et al. Il201lh . 

Perhaps we simply do not notice small shells sized 5- 
50 pc due to the low spatial resolution? The analysis of the 
original and smoothed data provided for the nearby galaxies 
ICIO and IC 1613 shows that an insufficient spatial resolu- 
tion can not explain the fact fact that most of the regions 
with high a are not related to the expanding shells. More 
important fact is that the points with high a, occupying 
the top left part of the I — a diagram, belong to the diffuse 
emission of low surface brightness and are spatially clustered 
around the star formation regions and on the periphery of 
the disc of ionized gas in the galaxies. Note that despite 
the low surface brightness, the signal-to-noise ratio here is 
sufficient for reliable measurements of a. 

It seems that the observed distribution of points with a 
high velocity dispersion of ionized gas is not bound to spe- 
cific shells, but rather to the integrated effect of young stel- 
lar groups feedback. Meanwhile, both the photoionization 
radiation of OB stars, and kinetic energy of the supernova 
explosions and winds of young stars lead to an increase of 
chaotic, turbulent velocities of ionized gas. At the same time. 



© 2011 RAS, MNRAS OOO.fTIl20l 



14 Moiseev & Lozinskaya 



IC10: Ha image 



300 



200 




300 



200 



100 



IC10 (distant): Ha image 
' ' ' 'i; ^4^1 




100 200 

Ax, orcsec 



300 



IC1 61 3: Ha image 



IC1613 (distant): Ha image 



300 



250 



200 



o 150 




100 



100 150 200 

Ax, orcsec 



300 



250 - 



300 




150 200 

Ax, orcsec 



Figure 3. The Ha images of the galaxies IC 10 (top) and IC1613 (bottom). Left column - the original results of observations with the 
scanning FPI, right column - the same data smoothed to the spatial resolution of ~ 40 pc 



a less dense gas has a larger amplitude of velocities than the 
gas in denser clouds. The same input of energy in the low- 
density medium provides higher gas motion velocities due 
to the dependence of the shock wave velocity on the density 
of the surrounding gas. And we have to take into account 
that the gas, shock-heated by stellar winds and SNe, is only 
partially confined and must be leaking out of the pores in 
the HII shells (Lopez et al. 2011). 

Given the above, to be able to interpret the observed 



I — a diagrams of dwarf g:alaxies, in addition to the thin 
shells, considered by Mufioz-Tun on et al.l (|l996l ) we have to 
bring in some more extended structures: the HII regions, sur- 
rounded by the coronas of perturbed gas of low density, with 
low surface brightness in the Balmer emission lines. This is 
schematically shown in Fig[7](a). When we look at the cen- 
ters of bright HII regions, there prevails a contribution of 
the inner regions both into Ha line intensity, and into the 
velocity dispersion. On the periphery, however, we mainly 



© 2011 RAS, MNRAS OQO.nif20] 



Ionized gas in dwarf galaxies 15 



b 40 




-16.5 -16.0 -15.5 -15.0 -14.5 -14.0 
Log I, erg s"^ cm"^ arcsec"^ 



-13.5 



300 



200 



100 



Velocity dispersion, km/s 




100 200 

Ax, orcsec 



300 



IC10 



50 



40 



30 



20 



10 



- • • •• • ! V • 



IC10 




-16.5 -16.0 -15.5 -15.0 -14.5 -14.0 -13.5 
Log \, erg s"^ om~^ aroseo"^ 



300 



200 - 



100 




100 200 

Ax, orcsec 



300 



Figure 4. ICIO: the original (top) and smoothed (bottom) data. The left plot shows the I — a diagrams. The red horizontal line marks 
the value of the intensity- weighted mean velocity dispersion am- The right plot shows the location of regions identified by different 
colours on the I — a diagram. The contours correspond to the isophotes in the Ho; line. 



observe high-velocity turbulent motions of the interstellar 
medium with low density, and, consequently, with high ve- 
locity dispersion. The region of the diagram, occupied by 
these points has a characteristic triangular shape because 
its right border is determined by the effect of declining ob- 
served velocity spread with increasing surface brightness. 

It is clear that talking about density, we should bear in 
mind the total density of gas, including not only ionized, but 



also the molecular and neutral species. First of all, because 
the main part if the gas in dwarf galaxies disc is in HI state. 
Figure [6] gives a comparison of the distributions o f HI and 
HII in seve ral galaxies of ou r sample, for which Begum et al.l 
(|2008l l and lOh et all (|201lh have published maps of the dis- 
tribution of neutral hydrogen. It can be clearly seen that 
the bright HII regions locate in places with high density of 
neutral hydrogen. Really, there are some small-scale devia- 



© 2011 RAS, MNRAS QOQ.fTMOl 



16 Moiseev & Lozinskaya 



Velocity dispersion, km/s 




IC1613 






^ 



300 



250 



200 



o 150 



100 - 



50 - 



-17.0 -16.5 -16.0 -15.5 -15.0 -14.5 
Log I, erg s"^ cm"^ arcsec"^ 




100 150 200 250 300 

Ax, orcsec 



IC1615 




300 



250 - 



-17.0 -16.5 -16.0 -15.5 -15.0 -14.5 
Log \, erg s"^ om~^ aroseo"^ 




100 150 200 

Ax, orcsec 



Figure 5. IC1613: the original (top) and smoothed (bottom) data. The left plot shows the I — a diagrams. The red horizontal line 
marks the value of the intensity- weighted mean velocity dispersion am- The arrow with a marking directs to the point, corresponding to 
the known supernova remnant. The right plot shows the localization of regions, marked by different colours on the I — a diagram. The 
contours correspond to the isophotes in the Ho; line. 



tions, in particular the peaks in the distribution of HI are 
often offset by a few hundred parsecs from the centres of 
current star formation. This effect is well known and asso- 
ciated both with the depletion of gas the stars form from, 
and with the mechanical impact of young stellar groups on 
th e interstellar medium. See, for e x ample, the discussion s 
in lThuan. Hibbard fc Levried (|200l ) : ISimpson et alJ (|201lh . 



where the HI maps for another galaxy from our sample, 
VII Zw 403, are presented. In some cases the bright shell 
structures, visible in the Ha, lie at the inner boundary of 
the 'holes' in the HI distribution, what is caused by the 
sweep-out and depletion of neutral ^as (see examples in 
iLozinskava et al.ll2003l : iBegum et aTll2006h . Note that now 
the idea of formation of giant neutral supershells by several 



© 2011 RAS, MNRAS OOO.fTti20] 



Ionized gas in dwarf galaxies 17 



12 


00' 




30" 


1 1 


00' 




30' 


10' 


00" 


66° 09 


30' 



DDO 53 



43'' 28' 00' 




38'' 51' 00' 




50'" 55^ 50"^ 

RA (2000.0) 



54'' 53' 30' 



UGC 850? 




45'' 40"^ 

RA (2000.0) 



L 

35= 



Figure 6. A comparison of surface brightness distributions in Ha (shades of g ray) and HI density (contours). The data on the neutral 
hydrogen for DDO 53 are adopted from the THING survey (|Oh et al.ll201lh , for the other of galaxies — from the FIGGS survey 
(iBegum et al.ll2008h . 



generations of stars during hundreds of millions of years be- 
comes generally accepted. In this case, local sites of star 
formation occur in the dense walls of ^ia nt HI super shells 
form e d by multiple genera tions of stars (see iMcQuinn et al. I 
I2OIOI : IWarren et al. II2OIIL and references therein). 

Therefore, a comparison of the HI distribution with our 
HII maps confirms that the gas (including both neutral and 
ionized states) in the regions with hi gh a has a low sur- 
face (and hence volume) density. Th uan et al.l (|200J) ex- 
plain the observed features of the distribution of surface den- 
sity and HI dispersion velocity in dwarf galaxies within the 
supposition that the neutral component of the interstellar 
medium has two phases in an approximate pressure balance. 
A 'cooler' phase is characterized by a relatively small spa- 
tial scale, higher density and low velocity dispersion, while 



the diffuse 'warm' phase is distinguished by increased veloc- 
ity dispersion. Such ideas on neutral gas are consistent with 
our explanation of the state of the ionized medium of dwarf 
galaxies. In this case, the ionized gas of low density, charac- 
terized by high- velocity turbulent motions, is a kind of an 
'energy reservoir', maintaining a high velocity dispersion of 
the warm phase of HI. However, speaking about the pres- 
sure balance of different phases of gas, it should be borne in 
mind that the early ideas of the dominant role of thermal 
pressure are in fact simplistic views at the state of the in- 
terstellar medium, in wh ich an impor tant role is played by 
the turbulent pressure ( Burkertll20Q6l V 

The question of what determines the velocity dispersion 
for the points of the 'horizontal branch' in the I — a dia- 
gram requires a further detailed consideration. This 'branch' 



© 2011 RAS, MNRAS 000,[TH20] 



18 Moiseev & Lozinskaya 



corr esponds to the bright HII regions, for which a ^ am- 
iMufioz-Tufion et al.1 |l996 ) refer to these areas as the 'kine- 
matic core', in agreement with th e mod el proposed by 
iTenorio-Tade. Munoz-Tunon k Coxl (|l993h to explain the 
nature of the supersonic turbulence of ionized gas in star- 
forming regions. These authors believe that the mean ve- 
locity dispersion of ionized gas in the 'kinematic core' is 
directly related to the virial motions, i.e. is approximately 
equal to the velocity dispersion of stellar population. The 
latter, in turn, is determined mainly by the mass and size 
of the star fo rming regio ns. La t er, th is model was used by 
iMelnick. Terlevich fc TerlevichI (|200(t ) to explain the physi- 
cal nature of the correlation of mean gas velocity dispersion 
am with the total luminosity in the H/3 line. It should how - 
ever be noted that the model bv lTenorio-Tagle et al.l (| 19931 ) 
describes the evolution of isolated relaxed spheroidal stellar 
systems. It is hence not applicable to the behaviour of gas in 
an entire dwarf galaxy, the star formation regions of which 
are in the gravitational potential of the disc and the dark 
halo. An alternative view on the nature of the H/3 (or Ka) 
luminosity-CTm correlation is given by the authors, arguing 
that the main contribution in the observed velocity disper- 
sion of ionized gas in different types of galaxies is provided 
by th e current star formation (|Dib et al.ll2006l : iGreen et al.l 
bold ). A detailed analysis of the nature of the 'luminosity- 
ionized gas velo city dispersion' corr elation is considered in 
our next paper (|Moiseev et al.ll2012l V 

Finally, note another interesting feature we detected on 
the I — a diagrams for the IC 1613 and UGC 8508 galaxies. 
These are points that are grouped in a horizontal lane with 
a relatively large velocity dispersion a > 30 — 50kms~^. 
These points are very well detached from the other diagram 
areas, and belong to the isolated remnants of supernova ex- 
plosions or other expanding nebulae around the young mas- 
sive objects, such as the Wolf-Rayet stars, ultra-bright X-ray 
sources, LBV stars, etc. (see FigU]). Therefore, the / — a di- 
agrams can also be used to search for unique and interesting 
objects in the emission galaxies. 



6 CONCLUSION 

Using a scanning Fabry- Perot interferometer mounted at the 
6-m telescope of the SAO RAS we have carried out the Ha 
line observations of seven nearby (D — 1.8 — 4.3 Mpc) irregu- 
lar dwarf galaxies of the Local Volume. To study the features 
of the distribution of radial velocity dispersion over the discs 
of galaxies, characterizing the magnitude of chaotic turbu- 
lent motions of ionized gas, we used the I — a diagrams. A 
combination of these diagrams and two-dimensional maps of 
radial velocity dispersion has allowed to identify some com- 
mon patterns, pointing to the relation between the magni- 
tude of chaotic motions of gas and the ongoing processes of 
star formation. 

Since the spatial resolution of these observations 
amounted to several tens of parsecs, we tested our results 
using the previously obtained high-resolution data for two 
galaxies of the Local Group, IC 10 and IC 1613, smoothed 
to the resolution of 40 pc. The main conclusions of our work 
are as follows: 

• There is a clear link between the surface brightness in 
the Ha line and the dispersion of line-of-sight velocities: 




Figure 7. The scheme, illustrating the location of points on the 
I — (J diagram. The insets show how we projected onto the sky 
plane the surface brightness distribution and velocity dispersion 
(a) from dense HII regions, surrounded by low-density gas with 
considerable turbule nt motions, and (b) f r om th e expanding shell 
within the model bv iMufioz-Tufion et al.l (|l996l V The dotted line 
shows the lines of sight, passing through different spatial regions. 



with decreasing surface brightness the range of a values 
is growing, the maximum velocity dispersion is always ob- 
served in the regions of low surface brightness. 

• In five galaxies (DD053, DD0125, UGC 8508, UGCA 
92 and VII Zw 403) we have identified expanding shells of 
ionized gas, sized 80 — 350 pc, formed as a result of col- 
lective action of stellar groups on the gaseous medium of 
galaxies. Characteristic kinematic age of the shells is 1 — 4 
Myr, indicating a relation with current star formation. 

• We demonstrate that the I — a diagrams may be use- 
ful for the search of supernova remnants or other compact 
expanding shells (nebulae around WR stars, etc.) in nearby 
galaxies. Based on / — a diagnostic we have found LBV can- 
didate in in the UGC 8508 galaxy. 

• T he model, previously proposed bv lMufioz-Tunon et al.l 
(| 19961 ) to explain the shapes of the I — a diagram of indi- 
vidual star formation regions, requires substantial additions 
in the case of dwarf galaxies, where the spatial scales are 
substantially larger. The most important addition here is 
that most of regions with high velocity dispersion are not 
related to specific expanding shells, but rather belong to the 
diffuse low brightness emission, surrounding the star forma- 
tion regions. We explain this behaviour of the observed a 
distributions by the presence in HII regions of the coronas 
of perturbed gas with low density and high turbulent veloc- 
ities. This supposition is consistent with current knowledge 
of turbulence in the interstellar medium . 

We hope that our results will be useful in the interpre- 
tation of the ionized gas velocity dispersion maps in dwarf 
galaxies. All the more so, since an increase in the number 
of such observations is expected in the coming years. We 
consider a direct comparison of velocity dispersion distribu- 
tions for neutral and ionized hydrogen as a challenging here, 
although the difference in spatial resolution would present a 
certain problem. 



© 2011 RAS, MNRAS QQQ.fTti20] 



Ionized gas in dwarf galaxies 19 



ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 

We have made use of the NASA/IPAC Extragalactic 
Database (NED) which is operated by the Jet Propulsion 
Laboratory, Cahfornia Institute of Technology, under the 
contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Admin- 
istration. This work was supported by the Federal Target 
Programm Scientific and Scientific- Pedagogical Cadre of In- 
novative Russia (contract no. 14.740.11.0800) and by the 
Russian Foundation for Basic Research (project no. 10-02- 
00091). AVM is also grateful for the financial support of the 
'Dynasty' Foundation. We thank Prof. Jayaram Chengalur 
who provided us the digital maps of the FIGGS galaxies 
and anonymous Reviewer for constructive advice, which has 
helped us to improve the paper. Also we thank Sergei Fab- 
rika, Olga Sholukhova and Vera Arkhipova for their discus- 
sion on LBV-candidate spectrum. 

Funding for the SDSS has been provided by the Al- 
fred P. Sloan Foundation, the Participating Institutions, the 
National Science Foundation, the U.S. Department of En- 
ergy, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, 
the Japanese Monbukagakusho, the Max Planck Society, and 
the Higher Education Funding Council for England. The 
SDSS Web Site is http://www.sdss.org/. 

The SDSS is managed by the Astrophysical Research 
Consortium (ARC) for the Participating Institutions. The 
Participating Institutions are The University of Chicago, 
Fermilab, the Institute for Advanced Study, the Japan 
Participation Group, The Johns Hopkins University, Los 
Alamos National Laboratory, the Max-Planck-Institute for 
Astronomy (MPIA), the Max-Planck-Institute for Astro- 
physics (MPA), New Mexico State University, University of 
Pittsburgh, Princeton University, the United States Naval 
Observatory, and the University of Washington. 



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© 2011 RAS, MNRAS OOO.fTIl20l 



20 Moiseev & Lozinskaya 



APPENDIX A: 

8508 



THE LBV CANDIDATE IN UGC 



After the first version of tiie paper was submitted we have 
performed new spectral observations of the emission knot 
with a double- horned Ha emission line profile in UGC 8508. 
On the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 8 (SDSS 
DR8) image which partly resolved the galaxy on individual 
stars this knot corresponds to one of the brightest stars on 
the UGC 8508 periphery (Fig. [AH left). In SDSS DR8 it has 
name J133049. 80+545419. 2. The spectroscopic observations 
were carried out 2012 Feb 20 /21 at the 6-m telescope of the 
SAO RAS with SCORPIO-2 (Afan asiev fc Moiseevll201lh fo- 
cal reducer working in the long-slit mode. We have collected 
3000 sec total exposure time with slit width of 1 arcsec un- 
der seeing conditions of 0.9 arcsec. The scale along the slit 
amounted 0.35 arcsec/pix, the spectral resolution was about 
FWHM = 6.5A in the spectral range 3800 - 8500AA. The 
integrated spectrum of J133049. 80+545419. 2 is shown on 
fig. [AH (right). 

Unfortunately, the signal at the wavelength shorter than 
^ 4500A seems very noisy, since we used CCD detector E2V 
42-90 optimized for "red" spectral range. Nevertheless, the 
spectrum reveals a lot of emission lines: strong hydrogen 
Balmer series with prominent He I and He H lines, weak 
Fe H lines are also detected. All these features are charac- 
teristic for emission-line star, not for H H region or super- 
nova remnant as we preliminary supposed from FPI data. 
This star has a huge equivalent widths of the Balmer lines 
(EW(lla) = 770 A), moreover the Ha line profile reveals 
multicomponent structure with broad wings. We fitted this 
profile with three Gaussians having similar central velocities 
and with FWHM ^ 80, 640 and 2030 km s"^ (the spectral 
resolution was taken into account). Remind that the nar- 
rower component has also double-peaks structure according 
FPI observations with high spectral resolution (sec. 13. 5|) . 
The emission nebula around the star is very compact, with 
diameter smaller than 12-15 pc, because it was not spatially 
resolved in the long-slit data. 

Based on these spectral properties we suppose that 
J133049. 80+545419. 2 is a massive star with strong stel- 
lar wind like luminous blue variables (LBVs). The ob- 
served spectrum is similar to some known LBV-candidates, 
for example J013332.64+304127.2 in th e M33 and 
J002020.35+591837.6 in the IC 10 galaxies (J Massev et all 
I2OO7I ). The SDSS DR8 photometric catalogue provides for 
J133049.80+545419.2 visible magnitudes g = 22.37 ± 0.13, 
r = 21.14 ± 0.06, i = 20.63 ± 0.05 mag corresponded to ab- 
solute magnitudes Mg = -4.78, Mr = -6.01, Mi = -6.52. 
The real luminosity of the star can be significantly larger, if 
the possible extinction in circumstellar envelope will taken 
into account (the Galaxy interstellar extinction according 
NED is inessential in this direction - Ay — 0.05). The strong 
Balmer decrement {iHa/lHp — 7.2) can be connected with 
dust extinction as well as with shock origin of the emission 
line spectrum. 

Discussion about origin of this star lies outside the 
frameworks of our paper, new detailed observations are 
needed. However, the presented results provide a very good 
illustration of the power of / — a diagrams method that al- 
lows us to found a new LBV-candidate outside the Local 
Group. 



© 2011 RAS, MNRAS OQO.nif20] 




^.(5 H.y 



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2 3 



H^ 



iliii4-^iiiH'n*'W-'H'*''*r^^ 




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Ionized gas in dwarf galaxies 21 



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6000 7000 

Wavelength, A 



3000 



Figure Al. UGC 8508. Colour gri image provided by the SDSS DR8, arrow marks the LBV candidate J133049. 80+545419. 2 (the left 
panel). Right panels show the spectra of this star in two intensity scales. The main emission lines are labeled. 



© 2011 RAS, MNRAS OOO.fTMOl